6 More Experiments on Slaves and Blacks You Just Might Not Know About

5 Posted by - August 7, 2018 - Injustices, LATEST POSTS

By now many people know about the different types of that were done on African slaves and other African-American people. However, when speaking of most people think of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment and a few other well-known experiments. There were many other studies and experiments done on people as well. Some of these experiments on the list you might know, but there a couple you might not know.

1. Experiments on John Brown by his Master 

A former slave, John Brown, described the experiment done on him by his master, Dr. Thomas Hamilton of Georgia. Brown described being made to sit naked on the top of a burning pit on a stool as part of Dr. Hamilton’s experiment. The temperature reached 100 degrees and Brown passed, then the supposedly good doctor stood by to determine how deep black skin blistered by observing Brown’s hands and feet. Before Brown passed there were many other experiments performed on him by his master as well. (Carnell, 2014)

2. Experiments on Sick Slaves

Not only were slave owners conducting , but hospitals were doing it as well. In the 1850s, Dr. T. Stillman placed an ad for “sick Negroes” and slave masters were happy to hand over any ill or elderly slaves who could no longer work. During this time, it was viewed as a win-win situation, especially if slave owners were actually able to get back sick slaves who had been healed. But, if the slaves were not able to return and died the hospital paid for their burial. The slaves were given no rights or legal rights.

3. Doses of Toxic Plutonium and Uranium Given to Blacks

In 1945, there was a black truck driver named Ebb Cade who was in an accident. Almost all of Cade’s bones were broken during the accident. While he was being treated at the hospital he was given a toxic dose of plutonium. Before the plutonium destroyed Cade’s body, he must have heard about the experiment and escaped from the hospital. He didn’t know it but he was the first to be given the deadly dosage— but he was not the last. There were many African-American guinea pigs who followed behind him, and these blacks were either injected with uranium or plutonium as part of a radiation experiment. Former Secretary of Energy Hazel O’Leary declassified information on government experiments on unsuspecting African-Americans.

4. Prisons Conduct Experiments on Blacks that Lead Later to Cancer and other Illnesses

During the 1970’s, prisons conducted experiments on prisoners, most of who were black. At Philadelphia Holmesburg prison, Dow Chemical paid to test potential carcinogens on the black prison population. Many prisoners developed cancer, mental illness and skin conditions.

5. The Removal of Fannie Lou Hamer’s Uterus without Consent

Most people know about the experiment conducted on Fannie Lou Hamer, if not here it is again. Fannie Lou Hamer while on the plantation developed a knot on her stomach. She went to see the doctor and while under his care he removed her uterus. So, she would never be able to have children. The people at the main house knew all about it, and the wife of the slave owner joked that “the knot Hamer lost was not all,” the word soon got back to Hamer. Hamer went on to become a voting and civil rights activist. Hamer was only one of many African-American women who were sterilized, a practice which became a favorite of white doctors. Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, trafficked in stereotypes and used the Negro Project to decrease black fertility.

6. Experiments on Troubled Black Teens with Fenfluramine

The Johnson’s received a knock on their door from researchers from Columbia University. They wanted to interview their son Isaac, who had been held in a detention center. The parents signed off on the interview, which they were told would be used just to determine whether Isaac might have medical problems. The parents did not know it at the time but Isaac was given fenfluramine, which causes serotonin levels to increase.

 

sources:

Medical Apartheid

http://breakingbrown.com/2014/03/white-torture-of-black-bodies-6-medical-experiments-on-african-americans-you-never-knew-about/

 

4 Comments

  • Latonya Moore June 2, 2016 - 10:12 am Reply

    This is why I believe that the medicines out there today are not designed to heal #black people. There were too many experiments to see how to destroy us.

  • Reb March 6, 2017 - 6:53 pm Reply

    Fanny Lou Hamer wasn’t a slave, at least in the legal sense of the word. Slavery ended in 1863-5 and she worked on a plantation from 1924-63. (When I read “slave owner” in relation to the dates, I did a little fact checking from various sources so I could cross check information). Hamer was a passionate civil rights activist, proactive fighter of poverty with her Pig Bank, and a survivor of an unspeakable beating in an unprovoked encounter with racist Mississippi Police. A real Bad Ass! The Negro Project was not what Margaret Sanger’s intentions for birth control. It was taken over by “progressive reformers ” (not in the current use of the word in 2000s). She did indeed accept an invitation to lecture for the KKK but photos of her on a pedestal are fake. There are no known pictures from that lecture, but she did mention the lecture in her autobiography. Being that she had to take a tone “… so my address that night had to be in the most elementary terms, as though I were trying to make children understand” seems to indicate her distance from them to the point of thinking them either childish or stupid. Also you will find that fake image on many disreputable fake news site with obvious political agendas. http://gizmodo.com/margaret-sanger-once-spoke-to-the-kkk-but-this-photo-o-1724547991

    Also, the story of John Brown seems a conflation of half truths. He wasn’t a just a former slave. He managed to escape. This seems to be an important detail in the narrative. His master was a Mr. Stevens of Georgia who gave John Brown over to a sadistic, snake oil salesman Dr. Hamilton who did 9 months of experiments on him that so weakened him, he was taken out of the fields for work and made to do carpentry instead, which he seemed to like. Yes, there was a blistering experiment done ( to see how deep the dark skin went in his body), but John Brown did not die. He went on to escape from a new master and even managed to write his memoirs, “Slave Life in Georgia” in 1855, which is where I got this information: http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/jbrown/jbrown.html

    Only had time to fact check 2 items that seemed inaccurate from the onset….I’m sure the other ones are likely full of half truths.
    Read once. Check 5-6-7 times, people!

  • I have really learned some new things by means of your web site. One other thing I’d like to say is the fact that newer computer system operating systems tend to allow much more memory to be played with, but they as well demand more ram simply to function. If people’s computer is not able to handle a lot more memory and the newest program requires that memory increase, it might be the time to buy a new Personal computer. Thanks

  • Dorothea Myers April 2, 2019 - 12:52 pm Reply

    博客美麗的搜索結果問候結果

  • Leave a reply