Civil Rights Leader Amelia Boynton Robinson Dies At Age 104, Her Legacy Will Live On

0 Posted by - August 27, 2015 - Black First, BLACK WOMEN, IN THE NEWS, LATEST POSTS

was a true influential African-American leader. Behind the names such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., there were key figures from the Civil Rights Movement such as Amelia Boynton Robinson. Even as a young girl, Robinson campaigned for the rights of women. She was born ready to be an activist.

Boynton Robinson, was born in Savannah, Georgia, where she worked as an educator. She also worked with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Selma, Alabama. She educated local residents on food production, nutrition health care and more, according to the Encyclopedia of Alabama.

Her leadership and her courage sparked and sustained a movement that transformed not just the South, but the entire United States.  Robinson was a civil rights activist who nearly died while helping lead the “Bloody Sunday” civil rights march in 1965.  She also became the first Black woman to run for Congress in Alabama, and it was because of her work in conjunction with other activists that the Voting Rights Act of 1965 passed. She is owed an enormous amount of respect and gratitude.

“Boynton Robinson, who was hospitalized in July after having a major stroke, turned 104 on Aug. 18. Her son said she had been living in Tuskegee and was hospitalized in Montgomery. Boynton Robinson’s family said in a written statement that she was surrounded by relatives and friends when she died around 2:20 a.m.” (Huffington Post) Robinson Passed away at the age of 104, but her efforts to make America a land of true equality will forever live on.

In this March 7, 2015 photo, President Barack Obama, center, holds hands with Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., left, and Amelia Boynton Robinson, right, who were both beaten during "Bloody Sunday," as they walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., for the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday."

In this March 7, 2015 photo, President Barack Obama, center, holds hands with Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., left, and Amelia Boynton Robinson, right, who were both beaten during “Bloody Sunday,” as they walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., for the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday.”

 

source:

Huffington Post

via Video Al Jazeera America News

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