June 17, 1957: The Tuskegee Boycott Began

0 Posted by - June 17, 2018 - Black History, History, LATEST POSTS

June 17, 1957: The Tuskegee boycott began.

African-Americans began to boycott city stores as a way to protest against the law that prohibited them from municipal votes by strategically placing their homes outside of city limits. Tuskegee, Alabama, had a Black majority, however, Whites mostly owned the businesses and held the municipal offices. African-Americans began a voter registration drive with the Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University), which obtained some success. Yet, the Alabama legislature redrew the Tuskegee town boundaries that excluded the Institute. In response, the boycott began.

African-Americans would make 80-mile round trips to Montgomery to buy food, clothes, and other necessities. It effectively created devastating economic consequences for Whites, who preferred to go out of business than give African-Americans the right to vote.

The boycott ended in 1961 after four years. The Supreme Court ruled in Gomillion vs. Lightfoot that gerrymandering districts to restrict African-Americans from voting is unconstitutional and the old town boundaries were restored.

Finish Reading The Originally Post on
http://nvdatabase.swarthmore.edu/content/black-citizens-boycott-white-merchants-us-voting-rights-tuskegee-alabama-1957-1961
http://articles.latimes.com/2000/sep/29/local/me-28706

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  • This And That – Hill1News June 18, 2019 - 8:36 pm Reply

    […] A couple of weeks ago, I wrote an article about gerrymandering. That’s when you outnumber them 10-1, but they still win by a majority. Where they do that at? Check out this link. I brought this up because on this day in 1957 the folks in Tuskegee, Alabama, was put on they list. That’s right, it was number two. Number one was that “black nig*@r” who moved into the house next to the widow Johnson. Now as a student of racistolgy, I can tell you when a racist just uses the “N” word, then most of the time they just trying to show off their supposed white superiority. But if they use the term “black nig*@r”, then they in they feelings and you can be in some real Mississippi Confederate army danger, so watch out. They had something special planned for him. They was just waiting for their hoods to come back from the cleaners. Fester wanted to forget the hoods and just wear pillow cases, but he was over ruled because a majority of them wanted a formal house and cross burning. Anywho when the black folks of Tuskegee decided to flex their voting power, the city move their neighborhoods out side of the city limits so they couldn’t vote for city offices. It was on then. You can read about it here. […]

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