Today In Black History On January 20th

1 Posted by - January 20, 2016 - January, Today In Black History

Eva Jessye was born (January 20, 1895) and went on to excel as the choral director for the first Broadway production of “Porgy and Bess.” This theatrical show, along with other plays, made her the first black woman to get international distinction when it came to being a professional choral conductor.
The Anti-Lynching Bill was proposed (January 20, 1900) as a long overdue offense, and applied to Americans of all races and ethnicity. In 1900 alone, more than 105 African Americans were L*nched; that number referred to only the reported lynchings. The hero to propose the bill was none other than African American Congressman George H. White of North Carolina.
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority was founded (January 20, 1920) thanks to the help of Phi Beta Sigma member, Robert Samuel Taylor. Thanks to Taylor’s efforts, thisĀ is the only NPHC sorority that is bound to a fraternity. Founded at Howard University, Phi Beta Sigma aimed to push away the stereotypes of other sororities and focused on viewing everyone as equals. They are huge when it comes to community service, and are one of the most nationally recognized sororities in the world. The five women responsible for founding the sorority are Arizona Stemmons, Viola Goings, Fannie Watts, Pearl A. Neal, and Myrtle Faithful.
Barbara Jordan was born (January 20, 1936) on this day, and is one of the leaders of the Civil Rights movement as a recognizable politician. As the first African American elected to the Texas Senate after the Reconstruction era, she went on to have a decorated career by fighting for the rights of others.
Josh Gibson passed (January 20, 1947), an athletic known for being a star in the Negro league and an eventual member of the Hall of Fame. His legacy remains strong, as baseball purists continue to refer to him as one of the best power hitters in the history of any baseball league, even though he played the catcher position.

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