At Black Then, we frequently see interesting photos that give us a glimpse into the past. They tend to show us a piece of black history that is often not covered in textbooks, in history classes, or shown in the media. In a photo that we found on Black History Album , we see this […]

While he was held under house arrest for some time in September along with Kasa-Vubu, Lumumba and others would escape. The house arrest was initiated by the U.N to keep chief-of-staff Colonel Joseph Mobutu from arresting them. There was a fear that he would be dispatched under suspicious circumstances. On November 27, 1960, he arrived […]

Africa in 1961 was undergoing a number of often violent political changes. In Angola, independence from Portugal was ongoing. Meanwhile, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, in-fighting would come to an end with the execution–or assassination–of Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba and two close associates.   Lead Up To The Executions The Democratic Republic of Congo […]

On this day American writer and important figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes, died. Born James Mercer Langston Hughes on February 1, 1902, to school teacher Carrie (Caroline) Mercer Langston and James Nathaniel Hughes. After his parents divorced, he was raised by his mother and grandmother. Hughes found his passion for writing as a […]

The Watts Rebellion took place in the Watts neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, between August 11th and August 17th, 1965. The incident was the culmination of decades of government oppression and repression of the Black majority population of Los Angeles, ranging from illegal beatings, shootings, torture, theft, crushing fines, and harassment through abuse of authority […]

Freedom cases such as those Elizabeth “Mum Bett” Freeman are something often overshadowed by a case such as the Dred Scott decision. Another important colonial case was that of Quock Walker. This was a case that served as the basis to end slavery in Massachusetts decades before the institution was ended nationally.   Quock Walker’s Promised Freedom Born 1753 in […]

One day before President Woodrow Wilson took office, Alice Paul led a group of women protesters in support of a constitutional amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote. By the end of the day, over 100 women had to be hospitalized for injuries. Despite being told to march at the back of the parade with […]

Serving as President of Burkina Faso, Blaise Compaore managed to hold on to his position in 1991, 1998, 2005 and 2010. It would be his final term where Compaore pushed to change a 2000 amendment which limited terms and term length. He managed to stay in office since the amendment didn’t take effect until the […]

At Black Then, we frequently see interesting photos that give us a glimpse into the past. They tend to show us a piece of black history that is often not covered in textbooks, in history classes, or shown in the media. In a photo that we found on Black History Album , we see this […]

BY WALTER OPINDE On this day, 21st May 1959, a great African-American woman politician, full of charisma and leadership capabilities, Loretta Lynch, was born. Loretta Lynch, on 27th April, 2015, entered the American historical records as the first black woman to be appointed as the U.S. Attorney General, under President Barack Obama’s administration. She was, […]

May 21, 1881, marks the day that Blanche Bruce appointed Register of the Treasury after serving as Mississippi’s U.S. Senator. Bruce was born in slavery in March 1841 on a Virginia plantation. His father was slaveholder Pettis Perkinson.   LIFE PRIOR TO POLITICS He would receive an education by his father and eventually freed. During the […]

With the Caribbean becoming more and more of a bother thanks to a number of slave rebellions in the 18th and 19th century, Europe was focusing on Africa. France held power in Benin during the 19th century and was making movements with the native inhabitants there. A partnership that allowed France to do business in Benin […]

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