The 9th Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers, led by Colonel Edward Hatch, were pitted against Victorio and his Apache warriors in May 1880. The battle saw the more straightforward U.S. military tactics of Hatch against the guerrilla tactics of Victorio—who also had the terrain advantage and was riding on momentum from the Alma Massacre weeks earlier. For some time the Buffalo Soldiers […]

In May 1950, Life Magazine released to the newstand (their May 8th Edition) with Jackie Robinson as the featured cover (the first time in the magazine’s THEN 13 Year History an African American graced their cover) Source: (182) Black History on Pinterest

  At Black Then, we frequently see interesting photos that give us a glimpse into the past. They tend to show us a piece of black history that is often not covered in textbooks, in history classes, or shown in the media. In a photo that we found on Black History Album, we see this […]

by Jae Jones Candace Hill is not just your typical teenage girl. You won’t find her sitting around concerned about high school events, or who is going out with who, or even snapping tons of selfies, and posting them to her social media account. No, you will find Hill trying to figure out and deal […]

Daily routines aboard the slave ships In periods with good weather, the slaves on most slave ships would be brought up on deck in the mornings. Normally the women and children would be allowed to move freely around the deck. The men would be chained together, because it was commonly believed that they would be […]

Alexander Crummell was born in New York. His father was a freed slave, reputedly an African prince brought from Africa to work for wealthy merchant in the city, and his mother was a free-born woman from Long Island. It is not known where in Africa their families originated. Although Crummell’s father was illiterate, his parents […]

When you think about Black billionaires one name usually comes to mind: Oprah Winfrey. But before the media mogul hit seven figures, Janice Bryant Howroyd had already turned $900 into a multi-billion dollar, award-winning staffing agency. In 1978 Howroyd founded the ACT•1 Group, the largest staffing firm owned by a woman of color. Today, it […]

Born Rafael Cordero y Molina in late 1790, Maestro Cordero was important in establishing free schooling in Puerto Rico. Born and raised in San Juan—then known as the City of Puerto Rico—the son of free Black tobacco farmers, Cordero was educated by his parents at an early age. His parents also taught other children in their […]

By Bashir Muhammad Akinyele Editor: Victor Trammell Photo credits: The Fortune Society Dr. Maulana Karenga is the creator of the Kawaida philosophy. Kawaida philosophy was put in the streets. It gave context for Afrikan people to challenge white supremacy for Black cultural and political power.  Kawaida is a kiswahili word meaning “tradition” and “reason.” It […]

At Black Then, we frequently see interesting photos that give us a glimpse into the past. They tend to show us a piece of black history that is often not covered in textbooks, in history classes, or shown in the media. In a photo that we found on Black History Album , we see this […]

Phenomenal Woman By: Maya Angelou   Pretty women wonder where my secret lies. I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size But when I start to tell them, They think I’m telling lies. I say, It’s in the reach of my arms, The span of my hips, The stride of my step, […]

On May 13, 1985, Move Headquarters was bombed. With the approval of Black Mayor Wilson Goode, the Philadelphia police department dropped explosive devices on the home and headquarters of the organization. By May 14, 1985, lives had been lost and people displaced from their homes. MOVE was founded by John Africa (Vincent Leaphart) in 1972. […]

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