Norma Merrick Sklarek, a pioneer in the field of architecture, was the first registered black female architect in New York. In 1962 she became the first black female licensed architect in California. In 1990 she became the only black woman elected to the American Institute of Architecture (AIA) College of Fellows.  Among many prominent designs, […]

Known as the “barber” of Natchez, William Johnson began his life as a slave. His freedom at age eleven followed that of his mother Amy and his sister Adelia. After working as an apprentice to his brother –in-law James Miller, Johnson bought the barber shop in 1830 for three hundred dollars and taught the trade […]

Photo credits: AHNS Clothing/T.R.U.T.H Apparel The fabric of building wealth and generational greatness in Black America’s communities has historically been woven together by two key elements: Black-owned business enterprises and the strong families that incorporate them. In the mid-American region known as the Mo-Kan (Kansas City, MO & Kansas City, KS), BBQ and successful black-owned […]

David Ruggles, abolitionist, businessman, journalist and hydrotherapist, was born in 1810 in Norwich, Connecticut. He attended the Sabbath School for the poor which admitted people of color starting in 1815. In 1827 he left Connecticut for New York City where he operated a grocery store for the next four years.  He then quit the grocery […]

At Black Then, we often see videos that make us stop and think. They frequently reveal information that is not broadcasted to the masses and are created by great talents that are not shown in mainstream media. In this video we found, we learn more about The Black Then Channel is an all-black history, news […]

Photo credits: rastafari.tv The Solomonic Dynasty was an era in Ethiopia’s historical record that lasted from 1270 to 1636. This was named due to the fact Emperor Yekuno Amlak was crowned ruler in 1270. Amlak proclaimed himself connected to a lineal descendant of Menelik I, son of King Solomon and Queen Sheba. Amlak ceased his brief authority of the Zagwes people on […]

Edna Lewis was a highly recognized chef during the 20th century. She is best-known for authoring three cookbooks about southern cuisine, The Edna Lewis Cookbook, The Taste of Country Cooking in 1976. Lewis set out to show the world the variety of dishes and comfort associated with southern foods. Lewis was born in Freetown in […]

Doctor Ruth Janetta Temple was the first African American woman doctor in Los Angeles, California. Temple was born in 1892 in Natchez, Mississippi. After her father’s death, the Temple family moved to Los Angeles, California in 1904 where her mother worked as a practical nurse. Ruth would care for her five siblings while her mother […]

At Black Then, we often see videos that make us stop and think. They frequently reveal information that is not broadcasted to the masses and are created by great talents that are not shown in mainstream media. In this video we found, we learn more about BLACK SUPERMODELS THAT CHANGED THE GAME The Black Then […]

So POPular!’s Janet Mock discusses Nicki Minaj’s new Madame Tussauds wax figure which features Minaj on all fours & the way people have used it to objectify her. Mock also talks about how black women’s bodies have been objectified throughout history.

Photo credits: YouTube/OTSOG Taytu Betul, considered is one of Ethiopia’s best leading figures, was Emperor Menelik II’s spouse. She played a key role in the defeat of Italian colonialists and in the establishment of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s national capital. Queen Betul was an Ethiopian governess who ruled Ethiopia with her partner in marriage, Emperor Menelik II, from […]

John Henrik Clarke, was an American historian, professor, and a pioneer in the creation of Pan-African and Africana studies, and professional institutions in academia starting in the late 1960s. Clarke was born, “John Henry Clark,” on January 1, 1915, in Union Springs, Alabama. He was the youngest child of John, a sharecropper, and Willie Ella […]

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