John “Mushmouth” Johnson: “Negro Gambling King of Chicago”

0 Posted by - April 10, 2018 - Black History, History, LATEST POSTS

John “Mushmouth” Johnson was a black gambling-house proprietor who made a fortune controlling the city’s policy racket and other gambling enterprises. He was well-known throughout the city as the”Negro Gambling King of Chicago.”

Johnson had little formal education before he took a job as a porter in a Chicago gambling house in the 1880s. Although he was not a gambler himself, he learned the business quickly and opened his own nickel gambling house on Clark Street.

In 1890, Johnson sold this his gambling house on Clark Street and opened a saloon and gambling house at 464 South State Street that remained in continuous business for 17 years until his death. Johnson protected his business through bribes to the police and contributions to politicians.

It was a mark of Johnson’s success that he became a partner in the Frontenac Club, an establishment that catered only to wealthy whites. Johnson used his money to support “race advancement” causes in the black community, though his business was seen as disreputable by members of the older black elite. After his death in 1907, Johnson’s wealth contributed to the establishment of a new black business elite when his surviving sister, Eudora Johnson, married rising black banker Jesse Binga in 1912.

 

sources:

http://interactive.wttw.com/a/main.taf-p=76,4,2,2&content=john-mushmouth-johnson.html

http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/2444.html

1 Comment

  • Jeffrey Charles Coon September 22, 2018 - 3:11 pm Reply

    Mush Mouth Johnson stood with a low class of African-American Democrats: Old Ham Carter, who had outlived his usefulness; George J. Woods, the casino king; Marsh, the convict of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Long Jim Miller, who scammed “The Broad Ax” out of a dollar for his six-month subscription and who furnished strawberries for the convicts of the 35th Street police station; George J. Terrell, who laid “The Broad Ax” out for three dollars, a sum he could not afford; Poney Moore, the stud-poker boss; Billie Piper, who operated a notorious dive at 141 West 47th Street; John Jennings.

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